Epidemiological mapping of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis for intervention strategies in Nigeria

http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njpar.v40i2.18

Authors

  • F. Nduka Department of Animal and Environmental Biology, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
  • O. J. Nebe Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • N. Njepuome Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • D. A. Dakul Department of Zoology, University of Jos, Nigeria
  • I. A. Anagbogu Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • E. Ngege Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • S. M. Jacob Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • I. A. Nwoye Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • U. Nwankwo Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • R. Urude Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • S. M. Aliyu World Health Organization, Country Office, Abuja, Nigeria
  • A. Garba World Health Organization, Country Office, Abuja, Nigeria
  • W. Adamani Sightsavers Country Office, Kaduna, Nigeria
  • C. Nwosu Sightsavers Country Office, Kaduna, Nigeria
  • A. Clark Sightsavers Country Office, Kaduna, Nigeria
  • A. Mayberry Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • K. MAansiu Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • B. Nwobi Department of Public Health, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja, Nigeria
  • S. Isiyaku Sightsavers Country Office, Kaduna, Nigeria
  • R. Dixon Sightsavers, 35 Perrymout Road, Haywards Heath, RH16 3BW
  • G. O. Adeoye Department of Zoology, University of Lagos, Nigeria
  • G. A. Amuga Department of Zoology, Nasarawa State University, Keffi, Nigeria

Keywords:

treatment, control, intervention strategy, prevalence, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, Schistosomiasis

Abstract

Helminth infections caused by schistosomes and soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) are among the most prevalent afflictions of humans who live in areas of poverty in the developing world. The level of morbidity and mortality caused by these helminthes requires urgent intervention. This study reports on the epidemiological mapping and intervention strategies for the control of schistosomiasis and STH in Nigeria. Epidemiological survey on the prevalence of schistosomiasis and STH was conducted in Nigeria between November 2013 and May 2015 in 19 States of the Federation and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), covering 2,160 schools /communities in 433 LGAs. Urine and faecal samples were collected from 108,472 pupils comprising 57,670 (53.2%) males and 50,802 (46.8%) females of age range 5 to 16 years. The samples were analysed using urine filtration and KatoKatz techniques. The target population for intervention was determined using the World Health Organization Guidelines for intervention strategies. Prevalence of 9.5% and 27% were recorded for schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminthiasis respectively from the pupils sampled. Highest prevalence of 26.1% was recorded in Niger State for schistosomiasis while the lowest was in Rivers State (0.1%). STH had highest prevalence in Akwa Ibom State (58.4%) and lowest in Yobe State (1.4%). Niger State also had the highest prevalence for co-infection (8.96%). Based on the prevalence of schistosomiasis observed, a total of 202 LGAs fall within the low risk category, 153 moderate and four LGAs were high risk category. The high risk LGAs were located in Niger and Kebbi States. Case-based management is required for STH in 191 LGAs while 177 LGAs fall within the low-risk and 60 LGAs were in the high risk categories. The findings of this study highlighted the treatment interventions required to facilitate scale up of appropriate mass administration of medicine, water, sanitation and hygiene intervention in the 19 States of the Federation and the FCT.

Purchase

References

WHO. 2017. Guideline for preventive chemotherapy to control soil-transmitted helminth infections in at-risk population groups. Geneva, p. 75.

FMOH. 2013. National protocol for epidemiological/baseline survey of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja.

Hotez, P. J. and Herricks, J. R. 2015. Helminth elimination in the pursuit of sustainable development goals: A “worm index: for human development. Neglected Tropical Disease Journal, 9(4): 3618-3625.

WHO. 2015. Investing to overcome the global impact of neglected tropical diseases; 3rd WHO Report on Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Lobato, L., Miranda, A., Faria, I. M., Bethony, J. M. and Gazzinelli, M. F.2012. Development of cognitive abilities of children infected in helminths through health education. Revista da Sociedade Brasileira Medicina Tropica, 45(4): 514-519.

World Bank. 1993. World Development Report. Investing in Health. Oxford University Press, p. 224.

Beasley, N M, Hall, A., Tomkins, A. M., Donnelly, C., Ntimbwa, P., Kivuga, J., Kihamia, C. M., Lorri, W. and Bundy, D. A. 2000. The health of enrolled and nonenrolled children of school age in Tanga, Tanzania. Acta Tropica, 76(3): 223-9.

Drake, L. J. and Bundy, D. A. 2001. Multiple helminth infections in children: Impact and control. Parasitology (Suppl.), 122: 73-81.

Stephenson, L. S. Holland and Ottesen, E. A. 2001. Controlling intestinal helminths while eliminating lymphatic filariasis. Parasitology, 121 (Suppl. 2000): 8-91.

Smith, J. L. and Brooker, S. 2010. Impact of hookworm infection and derworming on anaemia in non-pregnant populations: a systematic review. Tropical Medicine and International Health, 15(7): 776-795.

WHO. 2006. Preventive chemotherapy in human helminthaisis coordinated use of anthelminthic drugs in control interventions: a manual for health professionals and programme managers. World Health Organization. Geneva.

NPC. 2006. The Nigerian Population Census. National Population Commission.

Federal Ministry of Health. 2013. Nigeria Master Plan for Neglected Tropical Diseases. Federal Ministry of Health, Abuja.

Lengeler, C., Mschinda, H., Morona, D. and Desavigny, D. 1993. Urinary schistosomiasis: testing with urine filtration and reagent sticks for haematuria provides a complete prevalence estimate. Acta Tropica, 53: 39-50.

World Health Organisation. 1991. Basic Laboratory methods in medical parasitology.

World Health Organisation. 2010. Operational guide to mapping of schistosomiasis and soil transmitted helminthiasis and evaluation of control programmes. WHO, Geneva.

World Health Organisation. 2011. Helminth control in school-age children: A guide for managers of control

programmes. 2nd Edition. Geneva.

Uneke, C. J. 2010. Soil-transmitted helminth infections and schistosomiasis in school age children in subSaharan Africa: Efficacy of chemotherapy intervention since World Health Assembly Resolution 2001. Tanzania Journal of Health Research, 12(1): 322-8.

Handzel, T.,Karanja, D. M. S., Addiss, D. G., Hightower, A. W.,Rosen, D. H., Colley, D. G. Andove, J., Slutsker, L. and Secor, W. E. 2003. Geographic distribution of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthes in western Kenya: Implications for anthelminthic mass treatment. American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 69: 318-323.

Kefford, B. J., Palmer, C. G., Nugegoda, D. 2005. Relative salinity tolerance of freshwater macro invertebrates from the south-east Eastern Cape, South Africa compared with the Barwon River, Victoria, Australia. Marine and Freshwater Research, 56: 163- 171.

Osama, M. S. Mostafa 2009. Effect of salinity and drough on the survival of Biomphalaria arabica, the intermediate host of Schistosma mansoni in Saudi Arabia. Egypt. Acd. J. Biolog. Sci.

Midzi, N., Takafira, M., Moses, J., Clement, T., Lincoln, C., Gibson, M., Portia, M., Shungu, M. M., Isaac, P., Susan, L. M., Stanley, S. M., Anastancia, N., Lawrence, P. M., Simbarashe, R. and Francisca, M. 2014. Distribution of schistosomiasis and soil- transmitted helminthiasis I Zimbabwe: Towards a National Plan of Action for Control and Elimination. PLoS Biology, 10: 1371.

Hotez, P. J., Brindley, P., Bethony, J. M., King, C. H., Pearce,E. J. and Jacobson, J. 2008. Helminth infections: The great neglected tropical disease. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 118: 1311-1321.

Published

2019-09-01

How to Cite

Nduka, F., Nebe, O. J., Njepuome, N., Dakul, D. A., Anagbogu, I. A., Ngege, E., … Amuga, G. A. (2019). Epidemiological mapping of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis for intervention strategies in Nigeria: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/njpar.v40i2.18. Nigerian Journal of Parasitology, 40(2), 218–225. Retrieved from https://njpar.com.ng/index.php/home/article/view/293

Most read articles by the same author(s)

Similar Articles

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >> 

You may also start an advanced similarity search for this article.